Tag Archives: metal

Tea With Chris: Wikipedia Group Sex

Tea With Chris is a roundup of recommended links, posted every Thursday. Here are a few of our favourite things from the Internet this week:

Chris: I haven’t been online much this week, because I just moved and the wireless network at my new crib has been down for an agonizing span of time, but I couldn’t fail to mark the birthday of that all-time-great human once and again called Prince. Though his relationship with the Internet is a complicated one, I feel like he’d appreciate the spirit of this orgy-related scheme. If not, well, Michael DeForge drew a comic (also about the Internet (sorry, Prince)).

Margaux: The Toronto monthly lecture series Trampoline Hall (where people lecture on subjects where they are not professionally expert) has been going on for over 10 years. I was involved in it for many of those years, as was/is this blog’s Carl Wilson. I think I saw my other colleague, Chris Randle, take money at the door recently.

I went to the most recent show this past Monday night because Steve Kado was curating. I am a fan of Steve Kado’s performance work and mind and figured it would be a show I’d be interested in. Every month is curated by a different person. The show, hosted by my boyfriend Misha Glouberman, is always a good mix of stable and unstable. The structure of the show, designed by Misha and Sheila Heti, is always the same and the lecturers and curators and audience are always different. Misha does a brilliant job every time at creating a conversation with the lecturers and the whole room – and also at bringing the funny to the too-serious and finding the meaning in the too-funny (or the not-too-funny).

The show on Monday kind of floored me, which is pretty great for a show you’ve been watching for this long. I’ve been a bit slow to appreciate theatre, but the well-oiled machine of Trampoline Hall combined with the spontaneity of (always exactly) 130 people in the room reminded me of what a good old fashioned machine, that makes brand new things, looks like.

Steve’s show circled around epic adventures and time. The lectures by Guy Halpern, Amelia Erhardt and Chris Boni were a pleasure. Chris Boni stole the show (or made the show) with a confusingly dead-on abstract meditation on slow motion. At one point, in patiently describing a battle scene in the Iliad, Chris talked about the moment in the scene when you remember that you’re not the one looking up at the shining sword. Chris looked out to the audience and reminded us that that would be the moment when you remember it’s the hero’s hand that’s holding the shining sword, not your own. He said that that’s when your imagined body moves back to the other side and remembers it is only watching and not holding anything. That’s the kind of information you get from slowing down time.

This wonderful Mr. Rogers autotune collaboration between John D. Boswell and PBS basically sums up what I love about a good show and also sums up the art I’ve been working on this year. I guess that’s not surprising since I paid quite a lot of attention to Mr. Rogers once.

Carl: The Canadian government is starting an anti-terrorism unit in Alberta that smacks of the stinging taste of Cointelpro.

Speaking of civil liberties, one of the best pieces of music journalism recently revealed how people around the world are still losing those rights – or worse – simply because they are into heavy metal music. It sounds silly, at our distance from the Tipper Gore era, but if you’re in Poland, or Iraq, or many other places, it’s no joke. And keeping in mind the West Memphis Three, North Americans shouldn’t get too complacent about how easily our cultural tastes might suddenly be held in evidence against us.

I’m very excited about the release next week of the first album in 11 years by Rebecca Gates, former leader of one of my favourite bands ever, the Spinanes – you might remember my extended exegesis about their song “Hawaiian Baby” in the early days of Back to the World.

On a more personal note, this weekend is Twangfest, a country/alt-country/Americana/whateva festival in St. Louis, MO, that began as a gleam in the eye of an email listserv that was one of my formative Internet – and music-criticism – experiences. I first attended Twangfest 3, in 1999. I recall, to use the term loosely, some large part of it taking part in a ditch behind a hotel where there were dance lessons and many bottles of bourbon. The last time I was there, it was the tenth anniversary. Tonight it’s Twangfest 16, which makes me feel very, very old. And I wish I were there.

Among the many reasons is that headlining tonight is Wussy, the Ohio rock group Robert Christgau recently called the best band in America, making a strong case with which I am inclined to agree. Wussy is led by singer-songwriters Lisa Walker and Chuck Cleaver, the latter of whom fronted another one of my favourite bands ever, the Ass Ponys, in the ’90s (and played one of the most memorable Twangfest sets back then). So while I make a private toast to absent friends, please enjoy this joyful tune, “Yellow Cotton Dress,” dedicated to them all.

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Filed under carl wilson, chris randle, linkblogging, margaux williamson

Tea With Chris: Sleazy/Surreal

Tea With Chris is a roundup of recommended links, posted every Friday. Here are a few of our favourite things from the Internet this week:

Chris: I’d considered writing an essay about Ernie Bushmiller’s Nancy this year, but now that the wonderful Nancy Panels tumblr exists I feel compelled to do so. What did 1950s kids make of that unfiltered abstraction?

Thanks, Wikipedia. Did you know about this, Jody? “The Barrison Sisters were a risqué Vaudeville act who performed in the United States and Europe from about 1891 to 1900, advertised as The Wickedest Girls In the World. In their most famous act, the sisters would dance, raising their skirts slightly above their knees, and ask the audience, ‘Would you like to see my pussy?’ When they had coaxed the audience into an enthusiastic response, they would raise up their skirts, revealing that each sister was wearing underwear of their own manufacture that had a live kitten secured over the crotch.”

The new Destroyer music video, which goes from sleazy to surreal, is of a piece with its parent album’s jazzy louche-rock. When I was a kid, I assumed that my father’s extensive collection of Roxy Music and Steely Dan was bloodless “dad music.” Freudian, huh?

Carl: On Wednesday I discovered what I thought was the coolest iPhone app in the world. (And I am told that it works.) I said on Facebook, “It’s like the sunglasses in They Live except for languages instead of capitalism.” (Btw, I hear Jonathan Lethem’s book about that movie is great.) Later I discovered that this is a whole field’s worth of phone-based “augmented reality.” Predictably, Google has found a way to build in the capitalism.

Speaking of augmented reality: In a way it’s sad when things that are utterly un-Internet-like become assimilated to it. But that feeling pales before the joy of being able to read this proto-sorta-feminist magazine for aspiring groupies from Los Angeles in 1973 Take the “How Far-Out Are You?” quiz and consider the matter of “The Black Foxy Lady: Can you measure up to her?” In issue no. 2, the stars of the Groupies comic strip try to sneak backstage at an Alice Cooper show by wearing a snake costume and Louise Redbeard warns about “The Going Steady Trap.” Like groupies in general, the magazine doesn’t really challenge patriarchy on any level except the promiscuity taboo. But hell, that’s a big one.

To have a lot more stereotypes challenged, though, please to ring in 2011 with twelve CD’s worth of female-fronted heavy metal.

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Filed under carl wilson, chris randle, linkblogging, margaux williamson